Monaco: Coins Issued and Used

Showing only circulating coin types (regular coinage plus circulating commemoratives).

Monaco (1297 - )
Information about what currencies were issued by Monaco, with lists of coinage, as well as periods when foreign-issued currencies were used.
Currency: Monégasque Franc. Used in Monaco: (1837 - 1996)
CurrencyMonégasque Franc
PeriodMonégasque Franc
Used1837 - 1996
Description

The franc (ISO 4217: MCF) was the official currency of the Principality of Monaco until 1995 (de facto, 1996 de jure), when it changed to the French Franc. The franc was subdivided into 100 centimes or 10 décimes. The Monégasque franc circulated alongside the French franc with the same value. Like the French franc, the Monégasque franc was revalued in 1960 at a rate of 100 old francs = 1 new franc. The official euro-to-franc exchange rate was MCF 6.55957 to EUR 1.

Today, Monégasque coins have only numismatic value, including the fleurs de coins, or proof-like coins. The period for exchange of the coins for euros has expired.

The Monégasque franc was legal tender in Monaco, France and Andorra.

Currency: French Franc. Used in Monaco: (1960 - 2002)
CurrencyFrench Franc
PeriodFrench Franc
Used1960 - 2002
Description

The Monégasque Franc (ISO 4217: MCF) was the official currency of the Principality of Monaco until 1995 (de facto, 1996 de jure), when it changed to the French Franc. Together with France, the country switched to the Euro in 2002.

Currency: Euro. Used in Monaco: (1999 - present)
CurrencyEuro
PeriodEuro
Used1999 - present
Description

The currency was introduced in non-physical form (traveller's cheques, electronic transfers, banking, etc.) at midnight on 1 January 1999, when the national currencies of participating countries (the eurozone) ceased to exist independently. Their exchange rates were locked at fixed rates against each other. The euro thus became the successor to the European Currency Unit (ECU). The notes and coins for the old currencies, however, continued to be used as legal tender until new euro notes and coins were introduced on 1 January 2002.

The changeover period during which the former currencies' notes and coins were exchanged for those of the euro lasted about two months, until 28 February 2002. The official date on which the national currencies ceased to be legal tender varied from member state to member state. The earliest date was in Germany, where the mark officially ceased to be legal tender on 31 December 2001, though the exchange period lasted for two months more. Even after the old currencies ceased to be legal tender, they continued to be accepted by national central banks for periods ranging from several years to forever (the latter in Austria, Germany, Ireland, Estonia and Latvia for banknotes and coins; also, Belgium, Luxembourg, Slovenia and Slovakia will accept banknotes forever, but not coins). The earliest coins to become non-convertible were the Portuguese escudos, which ceased to have monetary value after 31 December 2002, although banknotes remain exchangeable until 2022.

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